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CAMP ARIFJAN CORRUPTION & CONTRACTING IRREGULARITIES

ARMY CORP OF ENGINEERS - SOLE SOURCES & CONTRACTING IRREGULARITIES

DOCUMENTING THE ARMY'S LACK OF PLANNING

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUESTS & RESPONSES

IDENTIFYING THE CONTRACTING OFFICERS BEHIND THE IRREGULARITIES

IDENTIFYING THE COMMANDERS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE IRREGULARITIES

LOCATING HIDDEN & CONCEALED SOLICITATIONS

DOCUMENTING UNWARRANTED SINGLE SOLE SOURCES

CIRCUMVENTING THE COMPETITION IN CONTRACTING ACT

IG REPORTS - CAMP ARIFJAN & ROCK ISLAND

DOCUMENTING PRE-SELECTION & STEERING OF CONTRACTS

ROCK ISLAND CORRUPTION & CONTRACTING IRREGULARITIES

Camp Arifjan Corruption & Contracting Irregularities

Published on 19-09-2015

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Camp Arifjan, a sprawling base of warehouses and prefabricated office buildings in the dusty Kuwaiti desert, is the center of the Army's financial operation for Iraq. It has handled more than $4.2 billion in military contracts.       It's also a center for corruption investigations.       U.S. authorities are investigating a web of more than $10 million in favors, bribes and kickbacks among Army officers, contractors and subcontractors at Camp Arifjan, court and military records show.       So far, 13 people associated with the Army's contracting operation in Kuwait have been charged with corruption in federal courts -- the majority of the 20 corruption cases brought to  date involving Army  contracts for Iraq. Eight of the 13 have pleaded guilty. Two enlisted soldiers at Camp Arifjan were courtmartialed for taking bribes.   Six companies accused of corruption in Kuwait also have been punished administratively by Army contracting officials, records show.       Cash, gifts, parties alleged       Those cases involve allegations of contractors offering shopping bags and suitcases stuffed with cash, wire transfers of hundreds of thousands of dollars into offshore accounts, gifts ranging from phone cards to SUVs, and parties with food, drinks and, in one case, a prostitute, court records show.       The Pentagon has 90 criminal investigations involving $6 billion worth of contracts, and a third of those probes have ties to Kuwait,

 

The question is "How did this culture of corruption come to pass in the office in Kuwait?"  A special committe was organized to investigate and created the Army fraud-fighting task force, Committe members acknowledged these problems with oversight, but never consider these as a culture. In fact, they have just addressed these problem of corruption, for the most part, as isolated incidents.    Records from the corruption investigations tell different stories.

 

Numerous testimonies made to the Army Criminal Investigation Command, countless personnels, officials and civilians alike  accepted cash, souvenirs, meals and the use of an SUV from military contractors in Kuwait, Iraq and other middle east countries from 2003 to 2005. Several confessions of  bribery, bid rigging, theft, kickbacks and fraud  were exposed and continue to be uncovered until now.    

 

Bribery and Corruption come in several forms and a lot of  Army contracting officers and contractors in  Kuwait benefitted extravagantly from them. Parties with  contractors and military personnel were held almost every night.        The biggest bribery case of the Iraq war so far involves Army Maj. John Cockerham, a former contracting officer at Arifjan, who is accused of taking $9.6 million in bribes from at least eight companies seeking contracts to provide bottled water and other supplies.  Other corruption cases       Those linked to Cockerham include some involved in other cases:       *Maj. Gloria Davis, a fellow contracting officer at Arifjan who worked on several contracts with Cockerham. Davis killed herself in December, a day after admitting to Army investigators that she took $225,000 in bribes from contractor Lee Dynamics International, federal court records say. Lee Dynamics also hired Davis' son, Damien Thomas, the company's lawyer says. The Army suspended Lee Dynamics from contracting in July.       *Diaa Salem, a businessman from Kuwait whom Cockerham named as a business partner when creating a  Texas company in 2004. The Army barred Salem and his firm, Jasmine   International Trading, from getting contracts for a year in 2006 in a separate case.       In that case, two Army soldiers working at Camp Arifjan's finance office were court-martialed for taking $7,000 from Salem to process Jasmine's payments more quickly, according to Army records released to USA TODAY under the Freedom of Information Act.          

 

Camp Arifjan is criminal enterprise operation and corruption center.